Does “Happy Holidays” Make Your Christian Blood Boil?


Merry Xmas!

Seasons Greetings!

Happy Holidays!

Happy Hannukah!

…Kwanzaa!

…Boxing Day!

I’m sure you could add to the list. In doing a quick on-line search, I discovered two more special days that I like—Bake Cookies Day (December 18th) and National Egg Nog Day (December 24th).

Let me offer a disclaimer here. This isn’t a disgruntled rant.

Now let me offer a confession. I have not made out a Christmas shopping list. And, no, I don’t plan on trotting through some local merchant’s Christmas-Eve-discount aisle in a mad race to get the perfect gift for my wife (sorry, Honey, but it’s true!).

Oh, you, Scrooge, you!

I deny the charge. I surprised my wife already with something she wanted—a nice camera. Why wait until December 25th to give a gift?

Now a word to all those whose blood boils at every tiding offered this December that doesn’t include the word Christmas.

1)      Don’t expect the dead to dance.

What?!!!

Do…not…expect…the…dead…to…dance.

What do you mean by that kind of crazy talk? I don’t expect the dead to dance.

Okay, here’s what I mean. Scripture states that a person without the life-giving power of the Spirit at work in his or her heart is dead. Remember what Jesus said to a would-be follower who delayed following him? “Let the dead bury the dead…”

People without Jesus Christ are dead. Don’t expect them to celebrate Christmas. Don’t expect them to come to our party. Don’t expect the dead to dance.

2) Do expect the living dead to party.

Look, just because some people refuse to say, “Merry Christmas,” or to have an office Christmas party, doesn’t mean they don’t like parties. Everyone pursues happiness in their own way. And their own way ends up the same place where my own way ends up.

Unless a person walks in the Way, unless he embraces the Truth, unless he invites the Life into his life, he ends up at a dead end.

3)      Don’t get angry. Get smart.

Some things that anger us as Christians shouldn’t. I remember a friend ranting against a card that said, “Merry Xmas!”

We’re x-ing Christ out of Christmas. How tragic! Next thing you know they won’t let us mention the name of Jesus in church.

X is the Greek letter chi (pronounced like sky without the s). The symbol represents a short-hand version of Christ. It’s not replacing Christ. It’s just saying it another way. X comes to us out of our Christian past and not from a secular attempt to remove Christ from Christmas.

4) Remember whom we celebrate.

We celebrate the One who spoke, “Let there be…” and there was…We celebrate the One who marches out the stars and calls each by name. We celebrate the One called Wonderful Counselor, Mighty God, Everlasting Father, Prince of Peace. We celebrate the Sea Divider, the Mountain Remover, the Song-in-the-night Giver, the Deliverer, the Resurrected One.

So why would you be upset that the dead don’t say, “Merry Christmas?”

Question: What do you suggest to keep this season Christ-centered?

Recommended for further reading: “Merry Christmas or Happy Holidays” at Christian Faith at Work.

About tnealtarver

I've traveled and spoken around the world but always love to come home. There I eat exceptional meals, drink coffee to my heart's content, and get loved like nowhere else on earth. I believe a community centered in Christ should be all that and so much more.
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2 Responses to Does “Happy Holidays” Make Your Christian Blood Boil?

  1. Chris Patton says:

    Hey Tom! Thanks for the recommended reading!

    Great post! I love, “Don’t expect the dead to dance.”

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