A Sunday Morning Observed


Following up on last week’s post, here’s a quick summary of my observations from Sunday at church.

My longest conversation took place prior to the worship service. Ann and her husband move to Florida this week. I expressed my well wishes, asked a few questions, and learned about the when, where, and why of the move.

After the early service, I spent much of my time tracking down the facts so I could correct any misinformation cycling through the pre-service notices. One Bible study’s date had been changed.

Here’s what I learned about myself.

1)      I can be a busy guy on Sunday mornings. I run the computer program from the back that puts songs, scripture, and church notices on the screen up front. I wasn’t aware of how much I focus on doing that job well (and I need to focus because I have zoned out in the middle of a chorus until Sister Anna turned around and glared at me).

2)      I flit. I typically meet and greet a lot of people between events (worship, Sunday school, etc.). Because of this tendency, one of two things happens. I don’t get into deep conversations or, if I do, I neglect something else I’m responsible for.

Here’s one take away from Sunday.

Deep conversations don’t happen very often or easily in the hurry of a Sunday morning. From experience (as pastor and as one talking to the pastor), Sunday morning definitely is the worst time to tell the pastor something you think is important. If you need the pastor to remember, write a note and put it in his hand. In my humble opinion, the best place for intimacy and openness to happen is in a small group setting.

Oh, yeah. As you might have predicted, I did talk football with a friend during our coffee-and-donut time.

Did faith issues or Jesus come up? During the service, yes, and, during the Sunday school/small group time, yes.

Questions: So what did you observe this weekend? What did you talk about?

If you enjoyed today’s post, consider subscribing. Each new post will come directly to your email inbox. In a typical week, I post two new articles.

Recommended link Stuff Christians Like, “The Mustard Sundae” video. When I saw a 11-1/2 minute viewing time, I thought, “Well, I’ll watch to see if it’s interesting but not the whole thing.” I watched the whole thing.

About tnealtarver

I've traveled and spoken around the world but always love to come home. There I eat exceptional meals, drink coffee to my heart's content, and get loved like nowhere else on earth. I believe a community centered in Christ should be all that and so much more.
This entry was posted in Community and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

4 Responses to A Sunday Morning Observed

  1. Conversations went from the Chargers to challenges people face in life, forgiveness in the class I taught, affirmations of the worship service (Lessons and Carols for us).

    As I read your thoughts, I remembered Andy Stanley’s observation, “Learning happens better in circles, then in rows.” (Small groups vs. Sermons) We see both working together at our church. We encourage on Sundays (Heb 10), and do life together in small groups (Acts 2).

    Thanks for making me aware of what happens on Sundays.

    • tnealtarver says:

      I like the Andy Stanley quote. That’s a keeper worth remembering. Thanks, Richard, for your thoughts. Three things happened for me–worship, learning, and just touching base. All are needed.

  2. I’m the same on a Sunday morning. I run sound for the first service, then teach a small group, and then play bass for the contemporary service. It’s a pretty hurried pace, and I feel like I’m also pretty frazzled by the end of it.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s